Land of the rising sun

Just back from a vacation in Japan – sharing a few of our favorite views (as Pixabay photographers captured the sights)!

japanfishmarket

Tokyo fish market

Tsukiji Market is one of the largest markets of its kind handling 2000 TONS of marine products daily.

 

 

 

 

 

japanfish

 

The variety of fish was staggering.

 

 

 

Rice field

Rice field

 

Rice fields are flooded to control the temperature and drained at harvest. We saw fields in various stages of growth (newly planted and flooded to nice size plants with little standing water).

 

 

 

 

 

Japansushi

And then, dinner.

 

 

 

 

 

Marcia

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What a gas!

Or, what gas?! We all know passing gas is normal and averages about 1 liter/day for adults (insert your own age and gender joke here). We won’t address how the volume and composition is measured (and I certainly won’t mention that velocity has also been investigated).

Diet has the biggest influence on the amount of gas we pass and its odor. When dietary fiber travels through the gastrointestinal tract, it arrives in the colon essentiallydried-beans unchanged. The fiber then gets worked over by the bacteria residing in the colon giving off gas as a by-product. Beans and foods in the cabbage family are notorious gas producers and two health foods! Sometimes, it’s the volume of these foods that gets things rolling.

Certain spices like cumin and coriander may also increase gas production. Milk, only if you are lactose intolerant, will produce gas. Two other items that can increase gas output are sugar alcohols and inulin.

Sugar alcohols are sugar substitutes frequently found in “sugar free” gums and candies. Xylitol and sorbitol are two examples you might see on a label. In small amounts, they tend not to be problematic unless you are already prone to GI upset.

I noticed inulin among the ingredients on a fudgsicle label when I questioned why a fudgsicle was bragging about its fiber content. Chicory root is what’s commonly thought of as an inulin fiber source, but many plants contain inulin. Again, in a small amount, its effects might not be noticeable, but if many foods you’re eating throughout the day have added inulin, there might be an unpleasant surprise to you and your close friends.

Speaking of…fiber is our friend – an important component of our diet but go slowly to be well,

Marcia

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